The Fly by Night Musicians Club is a not for profit community musicians club and music venue located in the heart of Fremantle, Western Australia.

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…so we had a little visit from Eddie Vedder!

CAT POWER/ MICK TURNER
Tuesday February 4, 2014

140204-CatPowerEddieVedder-PhotoCredit-EddaPinelli

REVIEW: HARVEY RAE, THE WEST AUSTRALIAN

It’s possible no one foresaw Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder joining Cat Power on stage this week. But that’s exactly what happened in Fremantle on Tuesday night, in a rare treat for concertgoers. Perhaps it shouldn’t be so surprising – Vedder was in town for the Big Day Out last Sunday and is performing two sold-out shows at Riverside Theatre this weekend. He also sang backing vocals on Cat’s 2003 album You Are Free.

Nonetheless, after two hours of stark and intensely personal singer-songwriter fare, it was the last place you’d expect to find a Big Day Out headliner. Vedder played on two songs, including the closing cover of Neil Young’s The Needle and The Damage Done, which was quite something. Cat, aka Atlanta, Georgia’s Chan Marshall, sang “Every junkie’s like a setting sun” with a conviction as telling as on her originals. It also drew intriguing parallels to Pearl Jam’s closing song two nights earlier when Arcade Fire’s Win Butler joined the band to cover Rockin’ in the Free World – also a Young song.

Marshall’s set had otherwise been an introverted experience, traversing mostly deep cuts from her albums up to The Greatest, usually joining five or six song medleys into suites. The brief crowd interactions were mostly indiscernible mumblings, like shyness cracking at the seams to reveal a troubled soul. But when everything clicked into place, moments of magic filled the air, as on Great Expectations, From Fur City and Names.

Just as impressive was The Dirty Three’s Mick Turner opening the show. His solo, post-rock instrumentals saw the talented multi-instrumentalist pull a dead ringer for Jim White’s drum sound on a drum machine, use a loop pedal to build layers of his signature guitars and run both a drumstick and a violin bow across his guitar strings. The result might be described as “The Dirty One”, Turner replacing Warren Ellis’ violin leads with more compelling lead guitar parts than his day band allows.

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